How to Make Paleo Beef Stew

Noel_Beef_Stew_022

This is a post from NF Rebel Chef Noel.

Hey Rebels! It’s been a while since we sat around the slow cooker and told harrowing tales of brave knights and powerful wizards.

(What? Do you not do that when you use a crock pot?!)

I think it’s just about time we had another slow cooking adventure, don’t you? The weather’s getting pretty chilly, at least for those of us in the northern hemisphere, so a low-maintenance beef stew will do just the trick.

NINTENDO64--Legend of Zelda The  Ocarina of Time_Jan22 17_36_17Coming home to a ready-to-eat dinner is one of the best feelings (and smells) in the world, like finding a treasure chest in a dark, dingy dungeon.

This recipe comes with two choose your own adventure options.

  1. The first is a super easy chop, set, and forget recipe that takes about 15 minutes of active cooking time.
  2. The second option is a little more complex and takes about 25 minutes active cooking time.

Both recipes make an awesomely delicious crock of beef stew that will warm the weariest of warriors from the inside out. Plus, the recipe makes a decent amount of food so you can feed a group of people, yourself for several days, or you can freeze and warm it as needed!

Let’s get cookin’!

Noel_Stew_1

A quick note before we dig into this recipe.

This might look like a lot of ingredients, but don’t get overwhelmed! This is a Level 1 recipe! 

The longest/most difficult part of the recipe is going to be gathering all your ingredients, I promise! All we’re doing is chopping them and tossing them into a crock pot. Boom. Done. Easy peasy!

Ingredients:

2 Sweet potatoes

4 Carrots

1 lb (.45 Kg) stew beef – This comes in packages pictured above. They packages will be labeled as “lean stew beef” or “extra lean beef stew meat.” This is pretty much meat that’s already chopped up into squares for us. Yay!

10 – 12 Mushrooms – If you can buy mushrooms in bulk where you shop, that’s best option for freshness. If you have to buy a pre-packaged bunch, no sweat! Just make sure the ‘shrooms don’t look slimy or smell weird/fishy. (It’s okay to be “that guy” in the grocery store who smells all your food!) If you hate mushrooms, omit this entirely!

1 Yellow onion – The type of onion doesn’t matter here. Buy your favorite! My favorite type of onion is whichever one is on sale at the time.

1 Box (32 oz or .95 L) chicken, beef, or vegetable stock – All types of stock are fine for this recipe. Legend has it that chicken stock gives stews the best flavor. Keep it simple, but be sure to read the labels and get one that doesn’t contain MSG or any weird chemicals in it.

2 Cups (236 ml) water – to cover the veggies in the pot with liquid

3 Tbsp (45 ml) tomato paste – This is most easily found in little cans, but it’s also sold in jars or tubes.

1 Tbsp (15 ml) dry thyme – Dried spices are totally cool, people!

6 Cloves or 1.5 tsp (7 ml) pre-minced garlic – Purists will tell you that pre-chopped garlic is a sin, but my mom bought some in bulk and gave me a ton, so that’s what I’ll be using! (Hi mom! Thanks for the garlic!)

2 Tbsp (30 ml) olive oil or ghee

Salt & pepper to taste – You may want to salt your stew AFTER it’s cooked and you’ve tasted it. Some store bought broths are more salty than others.

Optional:

3 Tbsp (45 ml) worchestershire sauce – I was lucky enough to find one that is organic and low sugar!

3 Tbsp (45 ml) coconut aminos – An alternative to soy sauce that can add some interesting flavors.

1/8 Cup (30 ml) arrow root powder – if you want to thicken your stew. The recipe without arrow root powder has a pretty light broth. I’m cool with it.

1/2 Cup (118 ml) red wine – This will add some more flavor to your stew, but it will also make it not paleo. It’s your call and your stew. The power is YOURS!

Equipment:

  • Knife – for choppin’
  • Cutting board – for choppin’
  • Crock pot – for cookin’ (Don’t have one? Here’s a great option!)
  • Spoons and cups – for measurin’
  • A spoon – for mixin’
  • Frying pan & spatula – optional for the brown’ step

Instructions:

 1. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes and the carrots.

Noel_Beef_Stew_3

 

2. Chop the carrots into medallions and cut the sweet potatoes into 1/2 inch – 1 inch cubes. Bigger is better when cooking veggies in the slow cooker. The bigger they are, the longer they take to cook, and since you’re cooking this stew for 8-10 hours, that’s a GOOD thing!

Noel_Beef_Stew_2

 

3. Dice your onion. (Refer to the shepherd’s pie post for instructions!)

Noel_Beef_Stew_025

4. Chop all of your mushrooms in half with the skill of a samurai.

Noel_Beef_Stew_012

Choose your own adventure!

If you have a limited amount of time or limited patience for cooking, skip to step 10.

Howevah! If you have more time and want to add some depth of flavor to this dish, proceed directly below to step 5.

5. Heat some oil in a frying pan. Oils with high smoke points will work best as you want your pan to be pretty darn hot to sear the meat. Ghee, duck fat, or light/refined olive oil are decent Paleo options. Refer to the list in the smoke point link for even more choices!

Noel_Beef_Stew_013

6. When the oil is hot, place your beef in the pan and let it sear (brown) on each side for 3-4 minutes. We don’t want it to cook all the way through. We just want it to brown on the outside. Why do we do this? That browning on the meat is something called a Maillard reaction. It adds depth of flavor and deliciousness to your dish.

When the meat has browned, transfer it to your slow cooker.

Noel_Beef_Stew_014

7. Next, we’ll sear the carrots and onions. Let the pan heat up again with some oil in it. Add the carrots and onions to the pan and let them brown for a couple of minutes. Stir them a couple of times so that they brown sufficiently on all sides.

If you are impatient and don’t let the pan heat up enough before throwing on your veggies, they may look like the below picture. So, let the pan heat up enough first to get that nice sear!

Noel_Beef_Stew_016

8. Now throw your seared veggies in the crock pot with the beef.

9. Take your pan off the heat. Pour 1/2 cup of your broth/stock into the warm pan and use a spatula or whisk to mix it around. This is called deglazing the pan (the bits of flavor that stuck to the pan when you were searing your meat and veggies is called “fond”). This will steam a lot, but don’t worry about it. Scrape all that stuff from the bottom of the pan. That’s the flavor. Get it.

Once you feel like you’ve gotten the bulk of the stuff suspended in the liquid, pour that liquid into the slow cooker along with everything else.

Beef_Stew_017

10. Add the mushrooms and sweet potatoes to the crock pot.

11. Now pour the remaining stock from the box into your slow cooker.

Noel_Beef_Stew_019

12. Add the tomato paste and thyme.

Noel_Beef_Stew_020

13. Add a couple more cups of water to cover the veggies and mix everything up well.

14. Place the lid on the slow cooker, set on low, and cook 8-10 hours! Your house will fill with irresistible mouthwatering smells as this cooks!

Noel_Beef_Stew_021

Set and forget!

Noel_Beef_Stew_023

Someone recently told me that they didn’t believe crock pot or slow cooking counts as real cooking.

I DEFINITELY disagree. Slow cooker recipes are some of my absolute favorites. They make incredibly tasty dishes with very little work. Plus, you have so many options to customize your meal. Here are just a few ways to customize this meal:

  • If you want to add more veggies to your stew, consider other hearty root vegetables like rutabagas and turnips – or even celery!
  • Love spinach, leafy greens, peas, or other veggies? Add them to the stew too! Just wait until it’s about half way done before throwing these in the pot. This will keep them from getting too soft and mushy. These types of veggies aren’t as sturdy and won’t stand up to slow cooking for long periods of time very well.
  • Are you vegetarian? To make a hearty vegetarian stew, use vegetable stock instead of beef or chicken, and more veggies and maybe even a can of diced tomatoes.

Depending on the size of your crock pot, they can make a TON of food for the week! As long as you are willing to plan ahead and have the patience to wait a few hours for your meal, slow cooking can be super rewarding. And it is TOTALLY cooking!

So, what are your favorite stew/soup ingredients?

Have you tried crock pot cooking? How do you feel about it? 

Beef stew is the last recipe of the year for Nerd Fitness! What progress have you made in your cooking this year?

Are you looking forward to improving your skills in 2015? Share your triumphs and new goals in the comments!

– Noel

PS: We’ve been adding these recipes and a few dozen more to our Nerd Fitness Academy, which has recipes, meal plans, workout plans, and the ability to complete quests and missions and level up as you get healthier. Check it out!

###

Photos by: Ocarina of time: Vizzed.com

 

Paleo Beef Stew
Recipe Type: Lunch/Dinner
Author: Noel
A hearty beef stew that will warm the weariest of warriors!
Ingredients
  • 2 Sweet potatoes
  • 4 Carrots
  • 1 lb (.45 Kg) stew beef
  • 10 – 12 Mushrooms
  • 1 Yellow onion
  • 1 Box (32 oz or .95 L) chicken, beef, or vegetable stock
  • 2 Cups (236 ml) water
  • 3 Tbsp (45 ml) tomato paste
  • 1 Tbsp (15 ml) dry thyme
  • 6 Cloves or 1.5 tsp (7 ml) pre-minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp (30 ml) refined olive oil or ghee
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Optional additions:
  • 3 Tbsp (45 ml) worchestershire sauce
  • 3 Tbsp (45 ml) coconut aminos
  • 1/8 Cup (30 ml) arrow root powder
  • 1/2 Cup (118 ml) red wine
Instructions
  1. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes and the carrots.
  2. Chop the carrots into medallions and cut the sweet potatoes into 1/2 inch – 1 inch cubes.
  3. Dice your onion.
  4. Chop all of your mushrooms in half with the skill of a samurai.
  5. Choose your own adventure. For a level 1 recipe, skip to step 10. For a leveled up recipe, continue to step 5: Heat some oil in a frying pan.
  6. When the oil is hot, place your beef in the pan and let it sear (brown) on each side for 3-4 minutes. When the meat has browned, transfer it to your slow cooker.
  7. Next, we’ll sear the carrots and onions. Let the pan heat up again with some oil in it. Add the carrots and onions to the pan and let them brown for a couple of minutes.
  8. Now throw your seared veggies in the crock pot with the beef.
  9. Take your pan off the heat. Pour 1/2 cup of your broth/stock into the warm pan and use a spatula or whisk to mix it around. Once you feel like you’ve gotten the bulk of the stuff suspended in the liquid, pour that liquid into the slow cooker along with everything else.
  10. Add the mushrooms and sweet potatoes to the crock pot.
  11. Now pour the remaining stock from the box into your slow cooker.
  12. Add the tomato paste and thyme.
  13. Add a couple more cups of water to cover the veggies and mix everything up well.
  14. Place the lid on the slow cooker, set on low, and cook 8-10 hours!
Notes
Shopping list: [br]2 Sweet potatoes[br]4 Carrots[br]1 lb (.45 Kg) stew beef[br]10 – 12 Mushrooms [br]1 Yellow onion[br]1 Box (32 oz or .95 L) chicken, beef, or vegetable stock[br]1 small can tomato paste[br]dried thyme (find it in the aisle with the spices)[br]1 head garlic[br]Olive oil or ghee[br][br]Optional ingredients:[br]Worcestershire sauce[br]coconut aminos[br]red wine[br]arrow root power

Get The Rebel Starter Kit

Enter your email and we’ll send it right over.

  • The 15 mistakes you don’t want to make.
  • The most effective diet and why it works.
  • Complete your first workout today, no gym required.
  • These are the tools you need to start your quest.

64 thoughts on “How to Make Paleo Beef Stew

  1. What would be the best way to store this if I wanted to save it for meals throughout the week?

  2. Little tip: instead of cutting carrots and sweet potatoes cleanly like a samurai, try to slide the knife slightly into theam and tear the bits apart by twisting your wrist. An abrupt cut will make the stew thicker and more tasty!!! Keep the good work guys 😀

  3. i generally put them in the fridge. i put a few things in the freezer, mainly soups. but really, i don’t mind eating the same thing several times a week, so anything i make gets eaten within a week or so.

  4. I realize it’s not super important, but the stuff stuck to the bottom of the pan is actually called sucs(pronounced “sook”, almost like “suit”, but with a k instead of a t), not glaze. Generally in the USA though, we use the term “fond” for the stuff on the bottom of the pan, although fond is technically the mixture after you add the liquid and deglaze that pan. It’s French for “base” or “foundation”, as it is the basis of a lot of sauces.

    I also could be slightly mistaken, and maybe glaze is a common term in some places, I’ve just never actually heard it referred to as that.

  5. “Someone recently told me that they didn’t believe crock pot or slow cooking counts as real cooking. ”
    I wholeheartedly agree, AND that’s why I love it so much. I hate cooking, so very much. It is one of my least favorite chores, right down there with cleaning the litterbox and vacuuming the floors. And on top of that, with “real” cooking, there’s risk involved. Forget to pay attention? BURNED FOOD. Wasted money. 🙁

    I have yet to mess up a crock pot recipe. Add ingredients, turn on slow cooker, set time, do other things…and then it’s time to eat delicious food. 😀 So. Thank you for including absolutely freakin’ UNREAL recipes for those of us who love our slow cookers.

  6. Peel the sweet potatoes and carrots? Ain’t nobody got time for that! Just wash, cut the ends and any dodgy looking bits off, and chop.

  7. Hm. You’re probably right. I read that it was called glaze, but only from one website. I’ll use more than one source for my research next time!

  8. I’d say a solid 6-8 people! Sorry I forgot to put this in the main recipe! Thanks for asking! We’ll add it!

  9. Haha. Fair enough. That would make this recipe even quicker! Personally I’m not a fan of the texture if slow cooked sweet potato skin, which is why I suggest peeling them, but with carrots it wouldn’t make a huge difference.

  10. I thoroughly appreciate that you referenced Serious Eats here. They’ve got a pretty awesome food blog going over there. If you’re really into nerdy cooking, I’d definitely recommend checking out the Food Lab. Food + Science = Amazingly epic awesome cooking knowledge.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/the-food-lab

  11. Hell yeah. Really, beef stew is infinitely customizable, but the important points are:
    1. brown the beef
    2. deglaze the pan
    3. put all that in a pot with bunch of veggies and spices
    4. cook until it’s good

    Here’s what I’ve discovered works well:
    – brown the beef in bacon grease
    – add a cup of red wine to the pot
    – add a tablespoon of tapioca flour as a thickener
    – scrub but don’t peel the carrot for a bit of earthy flavour
    – root vegetables are cheap in the winter. Again, if you like earthy flavours, scrub but don’t peel them.

    I prefer to cook beef stew in a pot on the stove, primarily because I can control how much it reduces.

  12. Definitely not trying to take away from the stew though, I promise! It’s a good, straight forward recipe. I just like to avoid miscommunications, and I know if anyone ever looks up how to make a pan sauce they’ll likely see the word fond.

  13. For a thicker stew without adding other “flours”, I like to add an extra handfull of vegge that gets pureed into the liquid at the end. Badabing badaboom.

  14. simple, but looks good. I will be trying this sometime this week. Thank you for the recipe. My cooking skills have increased dramatically this year alone (though I was never a ‘bad’ cook)

    I am not sure where to purchase arrow root. If I can’t find any I will probably use a gluten free flour to thicken the stew (I like my stew less soupy) Do you have any other alternatives other than arrow root? Only condition is that is still has to be gluten free.

  15. I’m starting to use the slow cooker more and more. I just made a bone broth with the bones from a rack of lamb and some roasted bone marrow. I’m looking forward to using it for a stew or a roast soon.

  16. Yes to slow cooking! I like combining a few chicken breasts straight from the freezer with a jar or two of salsa, whatever vaguely Mexican spices are floating around (cumin, oregano, adobo, different chili powders), a little chicken soup base (or just salt if you’re avoiding MSG), and an extra onion. Shred it 10 hours later and you will have delicious tacos for days and days. 🙂

  17. I just wanted to add a thought about the crock pot debate.
    Crock pots basically take the place of hearths and dutch ovens. While I love cooking with dutch ovens when I have the time (weekends, camping, etc.) or I can utilize one for a quick meal, crock pots are the bomb! Back when us girls stayed home, a stew, soup, or pot roast could be put in a dutch oven in the hearth or on the stove in the morning. It would slowly simmer all day while other chores were done.
    Unfortunately or fortunately depending how you look at it, those days are gone. But we can still enjoy a nice slow simmered stew, a pot roast, or even make yogurt with the handy dandy crock pot.
    If you have the time though checkout dutch oven cooking. Its fun.

    Jen

  18. Thanks for the shout-out to the vegetarian readers! Steve, I have often wondered (as veggie fitness nerds often do) what the environmental impact of the paleo diet is. You might know that cattle are a huge contributor to climate change, as fields necessary for growing feed cause deforestation, the cows themselves release methane, etc… I know paleo people love their meat, but have you ever considered going veg? Would you at least nerd out on the subject and write a post about a vegetarian paleo diet, if you haven’t already? (when you think about it, whatever the true paleo diet was back in cave people times was probably mostly plant-based and only very occasionally meat based)

    Love the blog and love the recipe!

    Carl

  19. It is so cold right now this looks AWESOME! Totally inspiring in the dregs of my winter/holiday/diet fail woes 🙂 Rock on, Noel!!!

  20. I’ve never dared to prepare a stew… If I don’t habe a slow cooker, how much would I need to cook it in…you know, a real pot?

  21. All excellent points. Thanks for the tips shuronic!

    My mom also used to make beef stew on the stove. I’ve done it a couple of times too, but I prefer the crock pot just because its so dang easy! Do what tastes best to you, and keep making awesome food. It sounds like you’re a great cook!

  22. Heck yeah! Making bone broth is one of the BEST things the slow cooker can be used for. I love it! A cup of bone broth makes an delicious alternative to coffee or tea on a cold winter morning.

    You may have just inspired me to make some this week!

    Pot roast would be pretty awesome. We have a recipe for crock pot pulled pork here at Nerd Fitness if you’re interested! Good luck and keep on kicking but in the kitchen!

    http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2014/07/14/crockpot-pulled-pork-1-pot-5-awesome-meals-camp-nerd-fitness-sale-ends-friday/

  23. Alright, alright, you’re the second person who has suggested this. This means it MUST happen in my kitchen! Sounds amazing!

  24. Absolutely Jo! What I would do is subtract the beef and the chicken stock and add a can of diced tomatoes and use vegetable stock instead.

    If you like mushrooms you can chop portobello mushrooms and use those also. They’ll add some of that umami flavor to the mix.

    You can use celery, other root veggies like rutabaga and turnips right off the bat, and toss in some spinach, chard, or kale at the very end of the stew’s cooking time (I’d say in like the last 30 minutes).

    If you eat rice and beans, even though they’re not paleo, they’re a nice complete protein source for vegetarians. Make sure you go with a long grain brown rice or wild rice. Not a quick cooking rice (so your stew doesn’t get mushy). And if you’re using pre-cooked, canned beans, you can toss them into the pot in the last 30 minutes as well. Kidney or black beans might go well with a tomatoey stew. 🙂 Good luck! Let me know how it goes if you try it! And if you have any questions you can email me at noel (at) nerdfitness (dot) com.

    Also, have you heard of Minimalist Vegan? She’s a friend of mine and she runs an amazing website with simple vegan and vegetarian recipes. This tortilla soup sounds totally delicious, and without the “diy frito topping” it’s totally paleo! Check her out!

    http://minimalistbaker.com/loaded-veggie-nacho-soup/

  25. Excellent points Jen. I love it!

    I salivate over dutch ovens, but have yet to find one in my price range. Guess I’ll have to save up! It’s a dream piece of equipment for me.

  26. You can cook it in a real pot. It’ll probably take an hour or so of hands-on time. If you’re willing to put in that time, it’s definitely worth it and you have fewer dishes to clean afterward. I was really intimidated by making stew in a regular pot instead of a crock pot the first time I did it, but it turns out great!

    Just use the soup pot to brown the meat and veggies. When they’re browned, scoop them out and set them aside in a mixing bowl. Deglaze the pot. Then add your sweet potatoes, other veggies, and meat back in and cover them with broth. Add your spices and tomato paste and mix that in. Then cover it, set your stovetop on low, and simmer the stew for about 45 minutes. Be sure you’re around to watch it so that it doesn’t boil over.

    Stew is a great dish to share with friends. Invite some people over to help you cook! While it’s cooking, hang out in the kitchen and play a card game or talk and snack on some fresh veggies. If you’re alone, listen to a podcast or your favorite music while you’re cooking to make the time go by faster.

    I hope this works for you if you try it! Let me know how it goes!

  27. Tapioca starch works well. You can also use corn starch if you don’t mind corn as an ingredient. I’ve heard that instant mashed potato flakes also works (if you eat potatoes and can find a minimally processed dried potato flake). Just add them at the very end and mix them in well to thicken the stew. Be sure not to do this if the stew is still boiling hot.

    Also, if you can remove some of the root veggies and puree them then add them back into the liquid at the end, I hear that works great as well (and there’s no extra ingredient).

  28. ok, dumb nitpicky question, but aren’t those yams? Sweet potatoes are generally a light yellow, while yams are orange. Does that impact the cooking or texture any?

  29. They are probably NOT yams. From the Library of Congress:

    Although yams and sweet potatoes are both angiosperms (flowering plants), they are not related botanically. Yams are a monocot (a plant having one embryonic seed leaf) and from the Dioscoreaceae or Yam family. Sweet Potatoes, often called ‘yams’, are a dicot (a plant having two embryonic seed leaves) and are from the Convolvulacea or morning glory family.

    Yams
    Yams are closely related to lilies and grasses. Native to Africa and Asia, yams vary in size from that of a small potato to a record 130 pounds (as of 1999). There are over 600 varieties of yams and 95% of these crops are grown in Africa. Compared to sweet potatoes, yams are starchier and drier.

    Sweet Potatoes
    The many varieties of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are members of the morning glory family, Convolvulacea. The skin color can range from white to yellow, red, purple or brown. The flesh also ranges in color from white to yellow, orange, or orange-red. Sweet potato varieties are classified as either ‘firm’ or ‘soft’. When cooked, those in the ‘firm’ category remain firm, while ‘soft’ varieties become soft and moist. It is the ‘soft’ varieties that are often labeled as yams in the United States.

    Why the confusion?
    In the United States, firm varieties of sweet potatoes were produced before soft varieties. When soft varieties were first grown commercially, there was a need to differentiate between the two. African slaves had already been calling the ‘soft’ sweet potatoes ‘yams’ because they resembled the yams in Africa. Thus, ‘soft’ sweet potatoes were referred to as ‘yams’ to distinguish them from the ‘firm’ varieties.

    Today the U.S. Department of Agriculture requires labels with the term ‘yam’ to be accompanied by the term ‘sweet potato.’ Unless you specifically search for yams, which are usually found in an international market, you are probably eating sweet potatoes!
    tl;dr What you call “yams” are probably sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes can range in color from white to yellow to orange.

  30. For more tender, pervasive meat use a small chuck roast cut in to fist size chunks. The precut stew meat often tends to be quite tough. Just before serving, fish out the chunks, pull apart and add back to the stew. It will be super tender and you’ll have more beef in each bite!

  31. The nice thing about slow cooking this stew is that it makes the beef super tender! This sounds like a great suggestion too though! I’ll have to try it sometime. 🙂

  32. (Totally copied this from a previous reply)

    You can cook it in a real pot. It’ll probably take an hour or so of hands-on time. If you’re willing to put in that time, it’s definitely worth it and you have fewer dishes to clean afterward. I was really intimidated by making stew in a regular pot instead of a crock pot the first time I did it, but it turns out great!

    Just use the soup pot to brown the meat and veggies. When they’re browned, scoop them out and set them aside in a mixing bowl. Deglaze the pot. Then add your sweet potatoes, other veggies, and meat back in and cover them with broth. Add your spices and tomato paste and mix that in. Then cover it, set your stovetop on low, and simmer the stew for about 45 minutes. Be sure you’re around to watch it so that it doesn’t boil over.

    Stew is a great dish to share with friends. Invite some people over to help you cook! While it’s cooking, hang out in the kitchen and play a card game or talk and snack on some fresh veggies. If you’re alone, listen to a podcast or your favorite music while you’re cooking to make the time go by faster.

    I hope this works for you if you try it! Let me know how it goes!

  33. Haha. Fair point Tom. I suppose it depends on your personal definition of “paleo”. Our goal with these recipes is to keep them as healthy as possible in order to help everyone achieve their fitness goals. (So I guess you could call it the “Nerd Fitness diet”). I’m not saying you should abstain from alcohol completely, but you have to be clear and honest as to whether drinking or using alcohol as an ingredient in your food will help you achieve what you’re looking for fitness-wise. If you’re cool with adding it to your cooking, by all means, go for it because it is delicious, but the recipe stands up just as well without the vino. Cheers!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *